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Reflecting on 1 Corinthians 15:1-11

As an aid to understanding and applying the text from which the sermon this week was based, you can use the following questions to talk with others, or to reflect and journal on your own.

:: Is belief in the resurrection of Jesus Christ crucial to the Christian faith? Why or why not? Can you be a Christian and not believe in the bodily resurrection of Jesus Christ? 

:: In verses 3-4, Paul quotes a creed that early Christians memorized. What use would the early church have for creeds? Do they have any benefit today? What does Paul mean when he says these things are of “first importance”?

:: Josh quoted several scholars on Sunday that said without both an empty tomb and the testimony of hundreds of eyewitnesses who claimed to see the risen Christ, Christianity never could have gotten off the ground. Why?

:: Look at verses 5-8. How did the lives of these people change after having seen the risen Christ?  How does this add to the evidence for the resurrection?

:: Read 1 Corinthians 15:14-15. What is Paul saying here?  Turning Paul’s negative statement into a positive one, how would you finish this sentence: “If Christ is raised then…”

:: Read 1 Corinthians 15:17-19. What is Paul saying here?  Turning Paul’s negative statement into a positive one, how would you finish this sentence: “If Christ is raised then…”

:: Read 1 Corinthians 15:32. What is Paul saying here?  Turning Paul’s negative statement into a positive one, how would you finish this sentence, “If the dead are raised, then…”

:: The resurrection validates Jesus as the Son of God. This means we ought to take seriously everything He says. This is a call to obedience. The resurrection also validates the work of Christ (He really does have the power and authority to die for your sins). This ought to be a source of comfort and hope. How does God want to challenge you or encourage you personally in light of the resurrection of Jesus Christ?

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